Beverly’s Birthdays

 

Can you remember any of your birthday parties from when you were growing up? For some of us, that might be a real stretch to tap that far back in our memories. But, for many of you, I imagine that there was at least one very special birthday that you can still remember – 20, 30, or 40 years later.

I remember a bowling party when I turned 8 (I think I rolled a 36), and I remember a sleepover I had when I turned 12 (don’t tell my parents, but we snuck out of the basement and roamed the neighborhood late that night). My oldest son, who turned 7 this year, plans the theme of his birthday parties for months in advance.  Kids love to have a special day where they are the reason to celebrate.

BB5

Beverly’s Birthdays exists because this is not the reality for every child. The organization got it’s start when the founder, Megs Yunn, spoke with a little girl named Beverly who had never had a birthday party, or even a piece of birthday cake. As Megs began to look more closely at this set of circumstances, she found that Beverly wasn’t the only child in the Pittsburgh area who had never been celebrated on her birthday…not by a long shot.

This didn’t sit well with Megs, and if the support she has been able to rally in the less than six years since she founded the organization is any indication, it hasn’t set will with a number of people. In that short time, Beverly’s Birthdays has come up with 5 different programs to help local kids who are homeless and/or member of needy families experience the joy of being celebrated on their birthdays.

The first, and what is probably the largest, of those programs is the actual Birthday Parties. Beverly’s Birthdays has partnered with over 60 organizations that work with local people in need to host monthly or seasonal birthday parties for the children they are serving.  The guests are the other children connected to the organization, and everyone gets treated to food, cake, games, decorations, and treat bags; all the things that would normally be part of a kid’s birthday party.

2

Additionally, the children celebrated at these parties receive birthday presents. Each package includes age and gender appropriate gifts, as well as a book and a tooth paste/tooth brush set.

While kids of all ages are eligible for a celebration, Beverly’s Birthdays realized that a lot of these families could benefit from support on the baby’s actual day of birth. Out of this realization came the Itty Bitty Birthday Cheer program, which partners with many of the same local agencies to host group baby showers that supply newborns with many essential item for the first year of life.

To round out their programs, the group has come up with two additional ways to help local kid’s celebrate. The Birthday-in-a-bag program sends a preassembled bag filled with necessary party supplies home with families that use the services of local food pantries. And the Classroom Cheer program parters with local schools that serve a majority of children below the poverty line to allow for classroom parties for the kids who learn there.

BB1

How You Can Help

There are a wide variety of ways that a volunteer can join in on the work being done at Beverly’s Birthdays. Volunteers are needed to help host the birthday parties, bake cakes, and assemble birthday bags. Additionally, for service minded kids out there in the community, Beverly’s Birthdays has developed a really innovative program they call Champions in Cheer. In this program, applicants go through a leadership training process that help them design and implement a fundraising project for Beverly’s Birthdays.

Both financial and in-kind donations are gratefully accepted. Take a look at the current in-kind Wish List if you need some ideas for the organization’s most pressing needs, or feel free to reach out to them and discuss any number of creative ways to support this organization that spreads joy all around the Pittsburgh region.

Make-A-Wish of Greater Pennsylvania & West Virginia

I shared a little bit of my brother’s story when I did the profile on Ronald McDonald House Charities of Pittsburgh last month.  His fight with cancer also put us in the position to experience, first hand, how the Make-A-Wish organization works.

When we were first approached by a hospital social worker about the prospect of working with Make-A-Wish, we were shocked.  We were under the impression that Make-A-Wish only worked with children who were considered terminal, and while we knew that Chris’s cancer diagnosis was very serious, were were absolutely not ready to believe that it might be terminal.  Apparently this is one of the greatest misconceptions about the work that Make-A-Wish does.

Alex-MAW Greater PA and WV 2017 Photos

While all Make-A-Wish recipients need to be between the ages of 2-18, and need to have been diagnosed with a life-threatening medical condition, I was thrilled to learn that many beneficiaries go on to live full lives after gaining victory over their illnesses.  In fact, Make-A-Wish relies on the public to refer potential gift recipients to the program.  After communicating with the family, the organization will then look to verify the child’s eligibility through his or her physician.

My brother, like about half of the gift recipients, chose to go to Walk Disney World.  And while this trip is far and away the most popular choice for kids (Make-A-Wish and Disney have teamed up to make the trip extra-special for the kids and their families) there really are very few limits to what is possible for these kids’ special wishes.  Basically the options are broken down into five categories:

  1. I wish to go to…
  2. I wish to be…
  3. I wish to meet…
  4. I wish to have…
  5. I wish to give…

Ma'Laun-MAW Greater PA and WV 2017 Photos2

Our local chapter, headquartered here in Pittsburgh, serves almost all of Pennsylvania and all of West Virginia.  They are quite busy.  Last year they fulfilled over 700 wishes, making them the first Make-A-Wish chapter in the world to cross that threshold. Since the chapter started up in Pittsburgh in 1983, they have fulfilled over 18,000 wishes.

Take a moment to stop and consider that number.  18,000 children, most whom were intimately acquainted with the inside of a hospital room and all the uncertainty that comes along with it.  18,000 kids whose little bodies had betrayed them in some way, shape, or form.  18,000 families who worried, prayed, and struggled, not knowing what the future would hold for their babies.  These 18,000 made a wish and had it granted.  They got to do something special. Something important. Something that allowed them and their families the opportunity to focus on something other than disease and doctors for a little while.  When medical treatment and crises have been your whole world, this sort of brief escape from reality is invaluable.

Elijah-MAW Greater PA and WV 2017 Photos7

How Can You Help?

Make-A-Wish does not receive any government funding or grants. This means they are fully dependent on private donations for the wishes that they are able to grant. Foundations and organizations do donate, but it’s still individuals who make up the largest percentage of the donations to Make-A-Wish. And, while 86% of your gift goes directly to wish-granting (it should go without saying that marketing and administrative fees are still very important), the organization even gives you the option to request that 100% of your donation goes to that end.  Beyond this, all donations remain with the local chapter. Your money will directly benefit local kids.

Make-A-Wish also has some really amazing ways to use volunteers. After some training, a volunteer can become part of a wish-granting team. These volunteers meet with families to help the ill child determine what wish will be best for him or her. After this, the volunteer continues to act as a liaison between the family and the organization throughout the process, helping to make things special for the wish child at every step along the way.

But the opportunities to help don’t end there. I’ll direct you to the chapter’s volunteer page where you can learn about a half-dozen more ways to contribute to the mission of granting wishes for kids with life-threatening illnesses.

Amelia-MAW Greater PA and WV 2017 Photos5

Wrapping it up

Since my brother did want to go to Disney Wold and enjoy the tip to it’s absolute fullest (something he tried to do with everything), he waited to take us along until his cancer was in remission (about 15 months after his initial diagnosis). He completed two major surgeries, a few rounds of chemotherapy, and ten weeks of daily radiation. By Thanksgiving of 1999 he was behaving like a normal teenager again, so that’s when we spent a fantastic week racing through the parks. Unfortunately Chris’s story wasn’t one with a happy ending.  His cancer ended up coming back and taking his life on Thanksgiving Day the following year.  But that week in Disney a year earlier was pure joy. And our memories of that week are still strong, and happy. We are truly grateful for that time we had together.

I’m sure other families have equally significant and memorable stories. In fact, I imagine there are 18,000 of them from out of the Greater Pennsylvania and West Virginia offices. I’m grateful that we have Make-A-Wish here to serve local children. They truly are a group that Betters the ‘Burgh.